Emily Bruhn

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Emily Bruhn

Post  emilybruhn on Fri Jan 30, 2015 2:30 pm

If I were to explain the concept of rhetorical situation or rhetorical analysis to a friend, I would probably use more general terms and 'every day' language. Because they are my friend, I would assume that we have shared some experiences together such as a school assignment, and I would draw on that experience to explain the components of rhetorical analysis. This shared assignment would help me express the choices that we made when completing the assignment in regards to our role as the writer, the intended audience being the teacher, the contents of our text or the requirements of the assignment and the medium in which we completed the assignment. In this scenario, I might explain how this rhetorical situation may cause us to make different choices in rhetoric than, for example, a quick email to my Aunt regarding a new puppy.

Generally when I am trying to make an argument or convince someone of something I tend to rely on logos, however if I were to start a blog or write an article online, I would want to appeal to an audiences sympathetic or empathetic side so I would us pathos. Pathos is the appeal to emotion, values and beliefs. If I were to write a speech, I would want to be logical and I would want to reason with an audience because my medium is my voice. However online, I would want to draw an audience in through images and short texts in order to draw their attention from their emotional side. In my opinion, when I am scanning an online article, my eyes are draw to the images or the bolded quotes rather than the longer paragraphs of text. While I may go back and read those paragraphs later, the reason I will be reading them is because the images caught my attention by appealing to my emotional side.

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Re: Emily Bruhn

Post  emilybruhn on Mon Feb 02, 2015 2:43 pm

Kairos describes something being fitting or timely in addition to recognizing a unique moment as an opportunity for a new rhetoric possibility, similar to an opportune moment.
This article addresses some modern concerns with web blogs right off the bat with some examples of incidences caused by web blogs. The first example addresses a high school student who's blog had been read by the FBI. She was upset because it had contained some very personal content that she didn't expect many people to have access to. This brings up the concern that seems most addressed by the article which is the blurred line of public and private information. Blogs are increasing in popularity and are largely intended for the public, yet at the same time bloggers tend to have the notion that what they write on their blog is private and personal and is not going to spread very far. Another issue with blogs that is also demonstrated in the first few examples in this article is a safety issue. Not only is a blogger who intentionally posts things at risk, but a third party who happened to have their photo taken and uploaded onto a blog is also at risk.
The popularity and appeal of voyeurism largely comes from humans being very social. As humans, we like to know what is going on and relate to one another through visual stimulation. We relate to one another through conversation and those conversations are largely driven by knowing something that someone else doesn't know. This creates an appeal for images, or blogs posts, or videos that are posted online with the intention of being personal. Voyeurism has simply become a larger more noticeable part of society in recent years because of the growing popularity of reality TV and web blogs.

Questions:
1. How does kairos relate to web blogs?
2. Is voyeurism relevant with web blogs or is it more related to reality TV?
3. Why are we only now discussing privacy issues with web blogs when this seems to have been going on for awhile?

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Re: Emily Bruhn

Post  emilybruhn on Mon Feb 09, 2015 2:53 pm

The blog I have chosen is called Snarky Rider. This blog is about horseback riding and it specifically addresses the ‘everyday’ trials or challenges that a typical horse owner might face. The author of this blog puts a comical twist on some of the less humorous aspects of the horse industry. In one of the blog posts, entitled Freaky Fridays, the author describes a situation where a potential buyer comes to try out her horse. In this particular instance, the buyer claimed to be an experienced horse person who was a teacher and arrived with a student to try out the horse. The author explained to the woman that the horse was not a beginner horse but the woman insisted she could handle it. “He gave her his version of a jog/trot (trust me it is not a jog!) Her eyes bugged out of her head, her ass was at least a foot and a half out of the saddle… Her mass was flung up and over his right shoulder, she was only saved from a face plant because he stepped underneath her to catch her. That was very polite of him since she was frantically reeling in the reins…” In this quote ‘he’ refers to the horse that the buyer is trying out. This demonstrates the author’s humorous take on a very real event that took place, and often takes place in the horse industry.

The ideal audience for this blog would obviously be horse owners or people who have had or currently have experience in the horse industry. This is evident because a lot of the terminology that is used is specific to equestrian disciplines and although it is on a second grade level for most equine enthusiasts, it is way over the heads of most people. Beyond terminology, this blog addresses situations that although humorous to anyone in the way they are described, would be most amusing to those who have experienced similar situations. In addition, this blog tends to use more mature language at times to depict frustration or disbelief which would suggest that this blog is geared towards an adult audience.

The comments for this blog are located on the right of each individual blog post. Generally there are two types of replies; serious opinion and agreement or appreciation. The serious opinions are people with horses that most times disagree with the overall message of the blog post. Generally these people write the longest replies and use a lot of terminology but it is important to remember that these people do not always have the knowledge or authority that they give themselves. The second type of response is agreement or appreciation. Generally the people that write these responses are just enjoying the content and often responding to the comedic delivery rather than the actual context of the humor.

This web blog caters to the second type of audience members. It delivers its opinion on a certain situation through comedy in order to keep from offending anyone with a different opinion while still describing a situation that caused them stress or grief. However, it is often also read by opinionated members who fail to see the humor of the blog post and instead focus only on the situation itself. The blog interests both of these groups of audience members by providing authentic equine situations and material as well as spinning it in a humorous enjoyable way.

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Re: Emily Bruhn

Post  emilybruhn on Thu Feb 19, 2015 11:18 pm

I’m no politician and to be honest I don’t pay much attention to politics or political history. However, to me it seems as though this Q&A carries a lot more weight than just the words that are spoken. The questions that are posed are formulated in a way that is supposed to pull at the audience’s heart strings, as well as highlight the republican agenda while not- so-subtly discrediting President Obama’s actions in office. In return President Obama answers the questions politely and with a formal rhetoric however he also not-so-subtly aims to discredit the republican.
For example; the first question is posed almost as a speech in and of itself. First it references a boy and his father going through hard times which is intended to attain a sympathetic response. Then it points out the policies that the Republicans suggested to fix unemployment, as well as the policies that President Obama chose to implement. Finally, the actual question came out, although I hesitate to call it a question because it basically was designed to say ‘we were right, weren’t we?’, but instead I believe it was asked to the effect of, ‘now that we have seen your policies fail, will you consider trying our approach?’
Both sides are intentionally constructing their comments to appear formal, polite, and gracious, while at the same time making sure there is no way either the audience or the opposing side can mistake their comments for anything other than criticism. In addition, both sides use historical political evidence to support their comment while intentionally leaving out any evidence or room for possibility that their policy could be just as bad or worse. Finally, the questions generally aren’t questions as much as they are criticizing speeches with a question tacked on to the end, intended to put the opposition in a corner.

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Re: Emily Bruhn

Post  emilybruhn on Fri Mar 06, 2015 2:27 pm

This article is about literacy and how it affects the way we write, speak and communicate with others. In this article, Ong argues that writing alters the way in which we not only communicate through print but the way in which we form our own thoughts and communicate verbally. “Without writing, the literate mind would not and could not think as it does, not only when engaged in writing but even when it is composing its thoughts in oral form.” Ong is goes on to explain how we as a population separate ourselves from those who are illiterate as though they are somehow inferior or less capable when in fact, he believes that they are simply going about communication in a way that is more natural for humans than literacy. “Since literacy is regarded as so unquestionably normative and normal, the deviancy of illiterates tends to be thought of as lack of simple mechanical skill… such views of writing as simply a mechanical skill obligatory for all human beings distort our understanding of what is human if only because they block understanding of what natural human mental processes are before writing takes possession of consciousness.” Ong believes that literacy have become such a large part of our life that we have lost touch with our natural mental processes and have adopted writing processes instead.

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Re: Emily Bruhn

Post  emilybruhn on Sun Mar 08, 2015 10:36 pm

Gee compares literacy to a person’s individual identity among a group of people. To him literacy is relative to societal acceptance and a community’s network of understanding. Literacy relates to the way someone walks, talks, acts and ultimately relates to other people in a group.

I felt as though I could relate his view of literacy to Ong’s interpretation of the way literate cultures view illiterate cultures and vice versa. I had not before explored the idea that literacy could give someone their identity; however after reading Gee’s work it is not difficult for me to understand his point of view.

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Re: Emily Bruhn

Post  emilybruhn on Mon Apr 20, 2015 2:30 pm

1. The Unintended Consequences of a Ban on the Humane Slaughter (Processing) of Horses in the United States
This article addresses the major consequences of banning horse slaughter in the United States with a large focus on the financial aspects of the industry. The article aims to illustrate the costs of banning horse slaughter and to convince the audience of the benefits that opening slaughter plants can bring to the United States economy and the horse industry. This source will provide financial statistics along with statistics regarding the number of unwanted horses in the United States. I can use this source to demonstrate the monetary need for horse slaughter in the United States.
2. Responses of Horses to Trailer Design, Duration, and Floor Area During Commercial Transportation to Slaughter
This article discusses how and why injuries occur in the trailers used to transport horses to slaughter in Mexico and Canada. This article will give statistics regarding injuries related to horse transport to slaughter as well as how longer trailer rides affect the number of injured horses. I can use this data and the arguments presented in this article to demonstrate how opening slaughter plants in the United States would keep the horses from having long and painful trailer rides to slaughter plants long distances away in Mexico or Canada.
3. The Potential Impact of a Proposed Ban on the Sale of U.S. Horses for Slaughter and Human Consumption
This article breaks down the costs for keeping horses and factors in all of the aspects of the horse industry to illustrate the money that is being lost by banning horse slaughter in the United States. I can use these figures to help demonstrate how legalizing horse slaughter in the U.S. will keep the money circulating through the horse industry and therefore allow for the horse industry to take better care of future horses.
4. Equine Slaughter Transport- Update on Research and Regulations
This article looks at transportation regulations and legislative restrictions surrounding the issue of the commercial transport to slaughter for horses. This article provides examples of laws and restrictions that I can utilize in my paper to demonstrate the benefits of legalizing horse slaughter in the United States. In addition it gives a history of horse slaughter which can provide me with examples to use in my introduction and my argument to lift the ban in the United States.
5. Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Slaughtering the Icon of the American West
This article differs from the first four because it provides an insight to why Americans are so against legalizing horse slaughter in the United States. In order to convince an audience that horse slaughter should be legal, I need to understand the reasons people are so against it and provide arguments that respond directly to those concerns. This article will provide me with the alternate opinions and help me to formulate my arguments.

Overall academia suggests that horse slaughter can be carried out in a humane way and is an appropriate response to the overpopulation of horses in the United States. As the fifth article suggests, the people discussing this topic outside of academia are horrified of this concept because to them, horses are pets and icons of the American West. They symbolize something more than just livestock to us and therefore we cannot bring ourselves to legalize slaughtering them anymore than we could bring ourselves to legalize the slaughter of dogs or cats.

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