Tranae' Chatman

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Tranae' Chatman

Post  tranaechatman on Fri Jan 30, 2015 11:16 am

Rhetorical situations are situations where you realize you must express yourself in a most appropriate way. You must take time to self reflect on the entire situation. You need to know who you want to communicate with, the severity or seriousness of the situation, and the most rational way to communicate the information you want to convey. All of these things help create the tone and mood for your audience. Through the way the you decide to prevent information, a reader can already sense whether the information is entertainment or informational. The process of recognizing the writer's intent is rhetorical analysis. The reader will begin to understand what the writer is trying to get across, what points are trying to be made, and in what ways.
In my opinion. the most effective way to convey information is by using ethos. When you appeal to the ethics of your audience, you spark a surge of emotion that makes you reader feel as if they need to take action. Ethics are what your readers know as right vs. wrong; it's what they've been taught since birth. When audiences feel that a wrong has been committed, they react vigorously. They take to social media, they talk to their friends, they find ways in the community to put ideas together. I feel like this should be the purpose of any work with information.

tranaechatman
Initiate
Initiate

Posts : 7
Join date : 2015-01-25

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Response 2

Post  tranaechatman on Mon Feb 02, 2015 11:45 am

Kairos is a defining moment of change or a major decision. In terms of the blog, kairos is the fast, drastic change of American focus to blogs, reality TV, cellphones, and the secret lives of others. Based on the reading, modern concerns of the blog are that they fade the lie between our right to privacy and our right to information. The public has become obsessed with seeking their own information about the private lives of the famous, since the media seems to pick and choose what to put out. This is problematic because it puts private moments on display for all to see; funerals, divorces, scandals, all intimate or embarrasing life situations become public debate. I agree with the article in this aspect because we tend to forget that celebrities are human as well. They are entitled to things that they only share with a few people; they don't owe us their private thoughts and lives. Another of my concerns is that the private lives will start to overshadow the things in life that actually matter. For example, in politics, it always seems as if the opposing team is trying to hit below the belt. Instead of acknowledging that we are all human and that we have all made mistakes, the opposing team finds the darkest part of their adversary's life and showcases it for the world. Never mind the potential of the candidate, never mind his/her personal growth. We search for who's "perfect" which often turns into "who can sweep their dirt furthest under the rug".
Voyeurism is important to writing and reading because it makes you feel as if you belong. It completes our longing for fitting into a group or being in the know. With voyeurism a writer lets his readers in on secret, exposing things that seem intimate and only trusted to few. It overall makes the material feel more personal.



Questions and confusions:
1.) the impact of the early 90s on the blog
2.)deeper meaning of kairos
3.) As technology advances, how will the blog and the pursuit of information?

tranaechatman
Initiate
Initiate

Posts : 7
Join date : 2015-01-25

View user profile

Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum