Rhetorical Situations and Analysis

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Rhetorical Situations and Analysis

Post  briankuhn on Fri Sep 05, 2014 5:39 pm

When explaining Rhetorical Situations and Rhetorical Analysis to a friend, I would explain that rhetorical situation is basically the context in which your message is being expressed, such as the way you phrase your message. Rhetorical situation involves how you communicate, as well as why. There is a motive behind it, and that creates the circumstance in which the writer chooses to express a certain point to a specific audience, by means of a strategically chosen medium. This enables the writer to get their message, or "text," across in the most efficient and effective way in order for the reader/audience to receive and hopefully understand their point. Rhetorical analysis breaks down the relationship between the four components of writer, reader (audience), medium, and text (the writer's message). This enables one to fully understand and connect the writer to the preferred medium (the means by which they express the intended message), which directs the text (their message) to an audience (or reader), who the writer hopes to influence or impart some knowledge or information to by communicating in some way. All of these components respectively make up the Rhetorical situation and analysis.

When I write online, I almost always appeal to Logos. I am a scientist and logic is what I understand most. I think and communicate by way of logic and reason, therefore it is easiest for me to put my thoughts and information into words meant to communicate with others logically. I dislike appealing to pathos because emotions can trump reason and even physical evidence of truth, in most simple minded people. Appealing to emotion, in most cases on the internet, appeals to the naive inner child in people, asking them to disregard what logic and objective reasoning would tell them, and simply act on their current emotion evoked by the message they receive, regardless of any lack of credit or logic. That is why I go for logos most times, and when i read posts by others, I look for both logos and ethos, like any good student and future scientist should.

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Kairos and Blogging response

Post  briankuhn on Wed Sep 10, 2014 1:24 pm

After reading several definitions and examples of the function and meaning of 'Kairos,' I would describe it as the use and appropriation of timing when conveying a point in rhetoric. In other words, a writer can create an opportunity using timing and circumstance to make their message relevant and effective.

Modern concerns for weblogging are mostly related to private information being shared and having consequences in the writer's life, as well as creating conflict with others (family, friends, coworkers/bosses). I think this is a real concern, although I would argue that it is unavoidable, and those writing blogs should take care to conceal or simply not write things that could jeopardize their personal and professional relationships, considering a blog is NOT private, no matter how much one thinks or wishes it was.

Voyeurism is important to modern blogging and writing because it gives a more realistic and raw understanding and feeling of what you are reading/writing/seeing. You do not feel it is as gilded and perfected, but more rough and true to the writer's personality and beliefs.

I can honestly say, I do not have any questions or confusions pertaining to this piece of literature. This being my fourth year of college, I don't feel it is out of my reach of understanding or comprehension as far as content and concept. I will however, for the sake of the assigned response, pose questions that could lead to discussion of the readings if prompted in class:
1. Is blogging a social necessity, used to express oneself, similar to a diary or journal? Or is it simply a frivolity and product of social media that shows no great benefit to writer or reader?
2. Does blogging impose unwanted voyeurism, or is it intentional and desired by the blogger that others get a glimpse into their private thoughts/life?
3. Has blogging and social media/online writing changed the way we write and even talk and think? I have heard more and more people compose their spoken and written sentences in terms of a Facebook status or a similar social media post.

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Re: Rhetorical Situations and Analysis

Post  briankuhn on Mon Sep 15, 2014 1:41 pm

The blog I chose to write about is called WV Hooligan. It is a soccer blog, focusing on MLS (United States Major League Soccer). It is written by Drew Epperly, and discusses the goings-on and expansion of the MLS, as well as trades, wins, and new achievements of the league. Some of the titles of posts/articles he writes on the blog are, "Las Vegas reaches agreement for possible MLS stadium," "Beckham: Miami expansion will happen," "Jermaine Jones lands in New England thanks to blind draw," and "Sacramento Kings owner joins MLS expansion efforts." Epperly presents his blog as a source for important news and evolution of the League itself, as well as its inner workings and current affairs. It is basically a sports news blog for American soccer league fans.
 The audience of readers for this blog is very obvious, although it can be elaborated on somewhat. For example, this blog is for soccer fans, but not all soccer fans would care about the content of the blog, or even understand it. Someone who is only a fan of EPL (English Premier League, aka Barclay's) football would find very little about this blog relevant to their teams, except the occasional trade from a Premiership team to an MLS team. And someone who is a fan of college soccer would likely have select interest in this blog, based on college players they favored who have advanced to the MLS. In all likelihood though, if you are interested in reading this blog, you are a huge fan of either the MLS or one or more MLS teams, or you just love all soccer in general. At the very least, you are a fan of the USMNT (US Men's National Team). I fall into all these categories, because I love the MLS and all of its teams, but I am a huge fan of EPL and other soccer leagues as well.
 The audience of this blog is represented in their comments on the posts of the blog. Commenters are as predicted- avid MLS fans who are very analytical and somewhat critical of every decision or project undertaken by the League. Much like myself, these bloggers/readers are very invested in the MLS and probably have a fantasy MLS team, and read statistics of players, teams, managers, leagues, and try to watch every game that is played. Almost every one of these commenters has also watched a lot of EPL and Europa and knows a good deal about English and other European teams/players, and can therefore make educated observations and analyses about transfers and international friendly games, etc.
  The blog works with this audience by posting the most relevant and unbiased soccer news, thus allowing for its readers to make their own opinions based on factual posts and relevant information that has not been skewed by one's personal opinion, but just delivered factually (and daily), by Mr. Epperly. The author, Epperly, appears to have extensive understanding and knowledge of the history of the League, as well as of the sport and its players. Thus he is able to cater to an audience with similar (if not less than his own) knowledge and personal investment in the sport. As an avid MLS fan, I definitely felt this blog was catered to people like me, and is rightfully listed in the top 10 soccer blogs on the internet, among a list of the top 50 that I found.


Last edited by briankuhn on Mon Sep 15, 2014 1:42 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : forgot to delete my last guideline after i had written it)

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Literacy Definition

Post  briankuhn on Wed Oct 08, 2014 1:23 pm

1. Summarize Gee's definition of literacy. Try using his terminology to illustrate his definition.
Gee did not stick to one simple definition to define literacy. He starts with a simple one acknowledging that yes, literacy does/can mean the ability to print and read words, but it goes far beyond that according to Gee. He discusses discourse of primary and secondary nature, to describe literacy being acquired through social settings and your surrounding circumstances/experiences. He also describes literacy being powerful/dominant; it is not just the ability to write, but to be able to influence thought and action through writing and reading.

2. Did this change your understanding of literacy? If so, how? And, how might this affect your understanding of your own literacy story?
It did not really change that much of my understanding of literacy, although it may have somewhat broadened my understanding of the definition of literacy to associate it with discourse/personal influence. I will definitely begin writing with this definition in mind, rather than the simplistic notion that literacy is purely the ability to read and write words.

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